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angel: "Golden ratio" in Mercury´s...?23 Feb 2007 09:56
Another topic I´d like to discuss...

Have you ever heard about the so called golden ratio or golden section? According to this article www.americanscientist.org aaand many others like that, I wonder if Mercury did use the golden section in his composing. As the article says, the scientist John F. Putz measured the number of measures in Mozart´s piano sonatas and compared the length of Exposition with the length of Development + Recapitulation (goes with the sonata-form which is, I think, the basiest form of making classic music). BUT I think that just measuring measures is not enough and we should go much more further in discovering golden ratio, for instance the harmony - measuring of distances, frequency of tones etc. But that´s very time-consuming, I fear :-/
1.PD 26 Feb 2007 13:56
> I wonder if Mercury did use the golden section in his composing.
I could find easily fragments in Queen songs where the ratio of lengths
is using the golden ratio. But IMO not more then what the statistics
result.
Alan Pollack in his analysis of "Hey Jude" suggests that the fade out point of the outro applies the golden ratio. I'm rather sceptic about this.
There are rough ratios also applied in the pop music. Maybe the most wellknown ratio rule is that a traditional bridge should be appear around 2/3 into the song. The sonatas too applied a rough rule for the sections, but I'm sceptic about the actual composers using consciously the golden rule.
2.BrianMay 02 Mar 2007 01:10
I'm sure it not consciuosly done. What you hear most sounds normal to you. Same as when you listen to eastern music a lot. Then the weird scales and microtones sound normal. Or when you listen to classical music or jazz a lot, it will be easier to write in uncommon scales, or make uncommon chords or modulation.

Stuff like this happens unconsciously. I don't know if you ever wrote a song, But in 99,9% of the music I've written I didn't check the theory books how it should be done, or what is usual. Besides: it would take you ages!


finding rules for everything is a bit weird. Sounds like Philosophy to me (eek!)
3.angel 02 Mar 2007 02:34
I agree that it is in most cases NOT consciously done. Even the scientist from the link I´ve provided said that Leonardo and other people DIDN´T use meters and think about where to put the golden ratio, but they were using it subconsciously (just as in nature it is used very frequently).

But you´re definitely right that firstly, it would waste incredible amount of time and secondly, it is a bit demagogic to seek some rules everywhere. However, this topic has just come to my mind and I began to think about that, nothing more.
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