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PD: Corrections05 Mar 2004 21:26
Ok I start this topic to compile a set of rephrased/corrected quotes from my analyses. Anybody can contribute. You post the "wrong" quote then the "corrected"/proposed quote. In a couple of weeks the modifications will be updated based directly on our compilation. Thanks in advance!
1.Sebastian 05 Mar 2004 22:39
'39

> Arranged and sung mostly by Brian May

I personally think it'd be better not to put anything about who arranged them until we're at least partially sure. They're not sung mostly by Brian. There are many voices by the others too. So I'd vote for that quote to be deleted instead of rephrased.

> There are no drums

Percussion consists of only tambourine and bass-drum.

-------

A Kind Of Magic:

In general I think Freddie's input should be mentioned. Perhaps not deeply analysed yet (that can be your "homework" when you revise the whole article) but meanwhile just adding that Fred affected the structure and the harmony would be just fine

Some Freddie-esque details in the arrangement I found from the top off my head: the structure, the bass-riff, the duet (one voice recites the line and the other sings it, like in How Can I Go On and Innuendo). Brian mentioned Freddie not only wrote the bass-riff, but also some little parts. I don't know what he means by that. Maybe some spacer or something.

Talking about Freddie, in the GVHIII audio commentary Brian credits 'Scandal' to "particularly Freddie and particularly me". I guess Freddie's input is more in the musical arrangements and structure, than in the actual songwriting. Note that Roger and Dave Richards have credited it just to Brian (although at least in the case of Roger he didn't neccesarily refer to the music, just the lyrics)

----------

Action This Day:

> The arrangement features new-to-Queen saxophones

The arrangement features synth-saxophones (programmed by the band's producer)

--------------

Bohemian Rhapsody:

> The song went through major changes until the final cut, especially the "opera" section.

I personally believe more the "Freddie had everything in his mind" theory, but that's just my point of view.

> Nothing extra except the special percussion gong and the bell-tree ("...down my spine")

Nothing extra except the special percussion gong and timpani. There are some guitar effects in which Brian made the Red Special sound like bell-tree ("shivers down my spine").

> The album version is preceded with a short mysterious multitrack guitar-trill with similar function to the trademark-shots that start big movies and computer games.

I vote for deleting this quote

> The Bismillah's are unisono

The Bismilah's are parallel octaves

> Roger hits the high Bb note, in close contest it is the highest sung note in the Queen catalog

Roger hits the high Bb note, in close contest it is one the highest sung notes in the Queen-catalog

> The fanfare-like ascending guitar fills go into a (two-part) harmony...

It sounds four part to me. Interestingly enough they start off in different notes but end up all doing the same D note. That sounds a lot like a Freddie arrangement to me and not a Brian one. Note Freddie simplifying harmonies from six to two in 'Somebody To Love' and 'Bicycle Race'

------------

Crazy Little Thing Called Love:

> There are hints that Freddie wrote the song on piano (an upright one)

Freddie wrote the song in acoustic guitar

-------------

Dreamer's Ball

> In the live version the solo was performed by Roger and Brian on "vocal brasses" (shades of "Seaside Rendezvous"). They did it with remarkable talent.

In the live version the solo was performed by Roger on "vocal brass" (shades of "Seaside Rendezvous"). He did it with remarkable talent.

-----------

Friends Will Be Friends:

> Towards the end of the Eighties the piano got almost banned from Queen records

Towards the end of the eighties piano was "shot" from it's lead or main instrument position.

----------------

Good Old Fashioned Lover Boy:

> The second subsection breaks the sentimental tone of the first. The first phrase (with AA' sub-phrasing) has unisono "Greek tragedy" choir (starring John Harris).

The second subsection breaks the sentimental tone of the first. The first phrase (with AA' sub-phrasing) has unisono "Greek tragedy" choir (starring Mike Stone).

----------

Is This The World We Created:

> Except the intro motif, we don't know what other ideas and tunes came from Brian and what from Freddie

Since Freddie and Brian didn't have time for ego fighting ("who does what") they just divided the work. Freddie wrote the lyrics and Brian wrote the chords.

------------

Mustapha:

> Roger uses bell-clusters (or  something like that).

Roger (or anybody) uses hawk-bells (or  something like that).

------------

Play The Game:

> Synthesizers' public debut on a Queen song ("Save Me" was recorded earlier, though).

Then it wasn't their public debut. I vote for deleting it.

----------

The Kiss:

> The last phase only prolongs the closing Am chord, and a short electric piano figure is played in the very last measure with the 9-8 appoggiatura

The last phase only prolongs the closing Am chord, and a short synth figure is played in the very last measure with the 9-8 appoggiatura

-------

The Show Must Go On:

> All four Queen members share the writing credit. Deacon and Taylor created the intro sequence - a really unusual contribution inside the band

All four Queen members share the writing credit. According to one of the different stories May said about this song, Deacon and Taylor created the intro sequence -a really unusual contribution inside the band

--------

You're My Best Friend:

> We know that John used a drum-machine in the composing process, too

Vote for deleteing it. Drum-machines didn't exist in 1975. Just like Israel in 4 BC had no mass comunication.
2.Sebastian 08 Mar 2004 14:20
Queen Periods:

> The authorship was surprisingly balanced as number of songs per band member: Freddie (3), Brian (3), John (2), Roger (2).

Brian wrote 4 pieces in that album

> This album saw Roger using more and more drum machines that he didn't ...

Drum machines weren't used neccesarily by Rog. As a matter of fact Roger used them less than the others. He preferred electronic drums.

> Many songs didn't have a guitar solo or any guitar at all

I disagree. All songs have guitar, even Body Language (it appears only in three seconds but it is there). Perhaps you can mention that John's role was dismissed since the others preferred to play the bass line in synths (not in all songs though)

> Freddie, on the other hand, wrote less for Queen, due to both his solo career and his illness

This is very untrue. In The Works he wrote 3 1/2 against 1 1/2 from Rog, 1 from John and 3 by Brian. So he was the major songwriter there, also in 'The Miracle' and 'Innuendo' he wrote a lot more than the others

> Roger (A Human Body, Hijack My Heart) on vocals

A Human Body doesn't belong to that period

> Most importantly, Freddie ended on the highest possible note with The Show Must Go On

I never understood this statement. Do you mean a sung note? if so, Fred sang higher notes several times, even with head voice (All God's People, Hang On In There, Silver Salmon, Was It All Worth It...)

> Most of it started as a capella performances by Freddie

The songs weren't done a capella, they were recorded as finished tracks. In fact the post-Innuendo pieces were already finished at the time Fred died.

> "Write me anything and I'll sing it," he used to urge the others.

It's also a fake legend. Freddie wrote the lyrics of all the three post-Innuendo songs, plus the music of one and a half of them

-------

I think you should re-write that article.

Including your article on influential backgrounds would be a good option too
3.Chaka 08 Mar 2004 22:36
 Most importantly, Freddie ended on the highest possible note with The Show Must
Go On

"the highest possible note" is a phrase meaning something like, he ended his career in the best possible situation, i.e. show must go on was the best representation of his talent at the end of his life, not a reference to a musical note.
4.Sebastian 09 Mar 2004 03:28
I suspected it could be that too... in that case not a problem

Anyway, Chaka it's so nice to see you here again.

Denes I also remember something you mentioned about memebr trademarks... that part is a bit raw currently. Why don't you re-make it? Or an introduction in the songwriting and arrangement characteristics of each member? I can do it if you want me to, but I'm unsure if you'd be ok with so much "external" input in your investigation.
5.PD 09 Mar 2004 07:00
'39

>> Arranged and sung mostly by Brian May
>They're not sung mostly by Brian.

The lead vocals and the harmonies in the choruses are sung by Brian (?).
The intro and the bridge harmonies feature other voices than Brian's.

> not to put anything about who arranged them until we're at least
> partially sure.
As for the arrangement I will add the word "probably".
- The counterpoint-style is reminiscent of that in "Teo Torriate",
- Brian had the most proper influences for making the arrangement for a folk-like song.
- The intro harmonies follow the chords which is probably Brian's creation.

"percussion" point: accepted

---------------------
A Kind Of Magic:

> In general I think Freddie's input should be mentioned.
I will put a sentence in which emphasizes Mercury's role, including the bass-riff.


Scandal
"Brian credits 'Scandal' to "particularly Freddie and particularly me".
that's new to me. It's interesting.




> I guess Freddie's input is more in the musical arrangements
> and structure, than in the actual songwriting.
Who knows...


"Action This Day" point - accapted

---------------------------------------
Bohemian Rhapsody:

> I personally believe more the "Freddie had everything in his mind"
> theory, but that's just my point of view.
I belive the "extension" theory ("let's put some more galileos in"
as somebody quoted Freddie).


"belltree" point: accepted
"Timpany" point: accepted
deleting the "pre-intro guitar fill" point: accepted
"unisono" point: accepted
"fanfare-guitars": to be checked.

"Crazy Little" point: accepted

"Dreamers Ball" quote: accepted

"Friends" quote: accepted


post to be continued.


> Denes I also remember something you mentioned
> about memebr trademarks... that part is a bit
> raw currently. Why don't you re-make it?
Frankly I forgat about the trademark article.
Gonna read it and see what can I do.
6.Sebastian 09 Mar 2004 13:42
> The lead vocals and the harmonies in the choruses are sung by Brian (?).

First chorus: "don't you hear my call" and "don't you hear me calling you" has only Roger in the high part. Middle part is Brian in front right but Freddie in front left. Low part is John imo. Ok, let's forget about John for a moment and let's say it's Brian... still there are the others

"Write your letters... children knew" is two part. Brian sings the high part. The low part is John in front channels. Even if we ignore that, still it's Brian in surround left and Freddie in surround right. At the end Brian did two additional parts. That one is in fact sung mostly by him then.

Next chorus's first half is three-part. In surround right Brian sings the three parts (the top one in falsetto). In surround left there's only the low part and the middle, both Brian again. In front channels there's only the high part (Roger) and the middle part (Freddie)

The second half is indeed all Brian, and it's the most contrapunctual part of the song. It's only Brian's lead and two harmonies. In surround left and right they're shown alone and so it's easier to note that in fact it's only Brian. In front channels you can note that in "knew" Freddie added a three-part "oh"

Final chorus's first half is done without Brian. Surround channels show only the top voice by Roger and the middle part by Freddie. In front channels you can hear the low part, but it's Freddie in both. No Brian on "sight". But Brian does sing all the three parts of the answer "all your letters ... pity me". Topline is in falsetto (surround left). Very nice part.

> As for the arrangement I will add the word "probably".

That's a good idea

> - The counterpoint-style is reminiscent of that in "Teo Torriate",

Perhaps Fred arranged 'Teo' too. I'm more "inclined" that Brian arranged both but we can't exclude the other possibility

> - Brian had the most proper influences for making the arrangement for a folk-like

That is a good point

> that's new to me. It's interesting. (Scandal)

Some friend of mine told me that he always believed Fred wrote the music due to some "melodic parts" or something like that. If we think about it Roger was talking about the lyrics when he said to Brian "I think this is yours". Dave Richards credited the song to Brian but perhaps he meant the lyrics as well... For some reason the structure of this song is more ... weird, than other songs from May. The main riff is somehow similar to 'One Vision', and Brian plays it in both guitar and keyboards so I guess it's his invention (moreover it doesn't sound Freddie-esque at all). It is possible then that Freddie wrote or co-wrote a couple of sections (perhaps one of the bridges), or that he arranged the song like he did with 'Radio Ga Ga' and 'A Kind Of Magic'

> I belive the "extension" theory ("let's put some more galileos in" as somebody quoted Freddie).

That's ok, there are two different theories to choose and unless we find footage of the sessions we'll never be sure about which one is right. A point favouring the "extension" theory is Mack's comment about Fred's songwriting (that he had the idea for the song, wrote it completely, and then re-wrote it several times until it was as he wanted it. He said Fred said that's how he had written 'Bo Rhap' and his epic songs in the first two albums). Freddie also said in 1984 that in the early days he had to "work his arse off" and every night sit on the piano modify the songs he wrote until he completed them. Another possibility though is that Fred had already done all that process with 'Bo Rhap' at the time they went to the studio. Point favouring that theory: the several comments from all four mentioning Fred had all the parts in his head, the theoretical fact that the backing track was recorded live (mentioned by Brian, Roger and Freddie), in which apparently all the blank spaces were left for the operatic bit.
7.Sebastian 10 Mar 2004 23:44
An idea I just thought is that perhaps if you find a couple hours to work on it, you can make an analysis for 'Sweet Lady' and then you have all the album finished! I'm sad that we can't have the joy of reading more analysis from you in a long time, but at least to read a full album (maybe with an overall analysis of the whole production, but that's asking way too much, isn't it?).
8.BrianMay 11 Mar 2004 11:58
> "Write me anything and I'll sing it," he used to urge the others.

It's also a fake legend. Freddie wrote the lyrics of all the three post-Innuendo
songs, plus the music of one and a half of them
______________________________________________________
Why would you think it's a fake legend?

There are no new post-Innuendo songs by Freddie, only A Winters Tale, Which, I heard, was supposed to be on the Innuendo album.
But all the Freddie songs on MIH are written long before Innuendo:

Beautiful Day (1979-80)
Made In Heaven (1983-84)
Let Me Live (1983...and a version written by Rog may excist)
Mother Love, I don't think Freddie wrote anything on this song at all..Since there are some quotes from Brian where he says: "I'm writing words on a piece of paper, he grabbed them and sang the lines" Maybe Freddie gave Brian some ideas, or added a few words, but that doesn't count as writing a song.
Born to Love You (1983-1984)
You Don't Fool Me: If Freddie co-wrote this with Roger and it is written after 1990 then it is the only post-Innuendo song he wrote...

So why is the legend fake?


9.BrianMay 11 Mar 2004 12:04
""Write your letters... children knew" is two part. Brian sings the high
part. The low part is John in front channels"

Low part is also Brian, believe me
10.Sebastian 11 Mar 2004 12:48
> A Winters Tale, Which, I heard, was supposed to be on the Innuendo album.

Freddie wrote it in a trip to Montreaux in 1991. The album had already been released. Plus Fred finished the lyrics 9 days before he died.

> Mother Love, I don't think Freddie wrote anything on this song at all..

Then why it's credited to May/Mercury? plus there's a manuscript from Fred (without the last verse of course)

> You Don't Fool Me: If Freddie co-wrote this with Roger and it is written after 1990
then it is the only post-Innuendo song he wrote...

Only those three songs are post Innuendo. And all of them were written or co-written by Freddie. So it is a fake legend.

About '39: If it wasn't John I would say it is Freddie, with a cold so the nasal voice comes out, but definitely not Brian. Still if it was Brian there are plenty of voices by Roger and Freddie and that's my point all in all
11.BrianMay 11 Mar 2004 14:33
"So it is a fake legend."

Even if he did write/co-write 3 songs, that doesn't mean the story isn't true. Freddie knew he was on the end of his days, so he asked the guys to write anything, so they could finish it after his death. But that doesn't mean Freddie can't, or didn't took part in the writing of the songs....It's logical that his part in writing (or co-writing) got reduced since he was very tired all the time, and only came in the studio for a couple of minutes.

12.BrianMay 11 Mar 2004 14:34
and about the bottom line in '39, In one of the channels on the dvd you can hear it clearly, The line goes a few semitones up in the end, and there you can hear it's Brian, not freddie, not John, but Brian.
You can also hear it in the way he uses his voice, the way it accent sounds. And so on
13.BrianMay 11 Mar 2004 14:34
just believe me
14.Sebastian 11 Mar 2004 16:48
About '39 I'm not discussing it anymore with you

About the fake legend: the legend says Fred didn't write more, which is untrue. It's John who stopped writing songs after 'The Miracle'. All Queen songs done after Innuendo were written or co-written by Freddie (considering of course that Queen ends in Made In Heaven). How many other songs are from Made In Heaven that aren't pre Innuendo and aren't Freddie or Fred+Brian/Roger? none. The songs in which Fred didn't participate in the songwriting are:

- Too Much Love: Pre-Innuendo
- Heaven For Everyone: Pre-Innuendo
- My Life Has Been Saved: Pre-Innuendo
15.PD 11 Mar 2004 19:11
I'm getting unsure about parts of the the '39 harmonies. One thing seems to me to be "sure":
The last phrase of the choruses is sung by only Brian including some falsetto notes in the last chorus. BrianMay must have referred to the surround channels, and I totally agree with his post No9. And also by Sebastian's post "not to argue about it". Take it easy.
As for the number of parts: see my corrected harmony tabs in the other local forum here at RL. I think it's a relatively "reliable" transcription, isn't it?
16.Bohardy 11 Mar 2004 20:11
"About the fake legend: the legend says Fred didn't write more, which is untrue"

- The legend, as you mentioned it, was '"Write me anything and I'll sing it," he used to urge the others'.
Nowhere in that 'legend' does it mention that Fred didn't write anything more. It simply indicates that Fred was willing to sing/record ANYTHING while he still had time. It doesn't mean "I'm not writing anything ever again, so if you guys want me to sing, you'll have to write something yourself for me to sing".

The 'legend' is anything but a legend. There's absolutely no reason to suspect it's anything other than the truth.

17.Bohardy 11 Mar 2004 20:24
Regarding corrections:

"The Prophet's Song

Bridge 1
It has two parts and it's nine measures long (7+2). The second phrase has an unusual system of accents that simply can't be transcribed into 4/4 meter even if it would result in round measures in the end. Just try to count along the beats! The preceding Chorus also closes with shifted accent (3+5). Here is the pattern of accents:


4+4+1+4+4+2+3+3+2+9
These accents create measures in 4/4 > 5/4 > 4/4 > 4/4 > 2/4 > 3/4 > 3/4 > 2/4 > 4/4 > 5/4 meters".

I think it most definitely can be simply transcribed as being in 4/4 meter, and lo and behold it does result in round measures at the end. It's just 9 bars of 4/4 with some fairly odd accents.

Rog maintains the snare on the 3rd beat throughout the whole of that bridge, retaining the 4/4 feel despite the other accents.
18.Sebastian 11 Mar 2004 21:34
Legend: I still don't get the "write me anything" if all the three songs have Fred's lyrics.

'39: Let's check part by part (forgetting about the lead melody for a moment)

the top harmony of
"don't you hear my call ... don't you hear me calling you"
|-8----12---12--12---12---|-8----12---12--10--13-12--10-| in the second string:
--

1st Chorus

Surround Right: Falsetto Roger (it's pretty obvious, the accent, the timbre... compare it with Brian's falsettos named below)

Surround Left: It's only heard in the background. Still Roger

Front Right: It's another person, or another take, still in falsetto. I think it's Roger again, without the echo, that's all.

Front Left: Double tracked Roger (they did add several takes to each part in that album, didn't they?)

-----------

Second chorus (the top voice says the full sentence (with "though you're many years away").
|-8----12---12--12---12---12----8-----10-8---8---8-8---8-----12--12--10--13-12--10-| in the B string:

Surround Right--> Falsetto Brian (very obvious, compare it with the previous chorus where it's Roger)

Front Left--> Falsetto Roger. The accent and vibrato classical of him is perfectly audible in the first "hear"

Front Right--> Falsetto Roger. Accent and vibrato found in "away" and "calling"

Surround Left--> Unsure if it's Brian or Rog. Perhaps both :)

-----

3rd Chorus:

Surround Right: Falsetto Roger. Note the accent in "away".

Front Left: It's notable in away, but it sounds weird. It can be anyone (perhaps a tired Roger).

Front Right: Same weird vibrato in "away", not Roger-esque. I started to suspect it's Freddie

Surround Left: Ditto

-----------

Middle harmony for the same parts
|-9----12---12--12---12---|-9----12---12--12---9-7---7-|

1st Chorus:

Rear Right --> Brian's accent is clear in "hear my call", as well as Fred's accent is clear in "calling you"

Front Left --> Ditto

Front Right --> Ditto (seems to be the same take)

Rear Left --> Freddie, no doubt. It's only heard in the background, but there he is. His timbre

-----

Second Chorus middle voice
|-9----12---12--12---12----7----7------9-7---7---7-7---9-----12--12--12---9-7---7-| in the G string)

Surround Right: Brian, no doubt.

Front Left: Brian. Pretty clear

Front Right: Brian. "Many" and "calling you" have his expression

Surround Left: Brian

-------------

Third Chorus Middle part:

Surround Right: Freddie. Multi-tracked and compressed. Listen to any of his solo albums to note the same sound. Or more to the point, the harmonies of 'Lazing On A Sunday Afternoon'

Front Left: Brian

Front Right: Freddie. Note his accent and pronunciation in "calling you"

Rear Left: Freddie. Multi-tracked and compressed again

--------------

First chorus low part:
|-9----12---12--12--/12---|-9----12---12--12---5--5---4-| in D string

Surround Right: Freddie. Note the way he vibrates in "calling you"

Front Left: Ditto.

Front Right: Absent

Surround Left: Not present

----------

2nd Chorus Bottomline
|-9----12---12--12---12----7----7------9-7---7---7-7---9-----12--12--12---9-7---7-| in D string

Surround Right: Brian (compare it with the first chorus "calling you" and you'll note the difference. In the first chorus it's Fred)

Front Left: Absent.

Front Right: Absent.

Surround Left: Brian (same take I guess)

------------------------------

"Write your letters" first chorus
|--9----12---12-12--9---7---5----9---9---5--5--5---75---2
19.PD 11 Mar 2004 22:08
These accents create measures in 4/4 > 5/4 > 4/4 > 4/4 > 2/4 > 3/4
> 3/4 > 2/4 > 4/4 > 5/4 meters".

> I think it most definitely can be simply transcribed as being in 4/4 meter,
> and lo and behold it does result in round measures at the end. It's just
> 9 bars of 4/4 with>some fairly odd accents.

It definitely can be transcribed in 4/4 in an odd way, but the oddity for my ears (especially from the fifth 4/4 measure on) reaches the extent where the usage of odd meters results in a much more natural flow of beats. It's not like a simple shifted accent like for example the intro hook of "In The Army Now" (3+5 pattern).

On the other hand: I have transcribed similar "shifted" meters in the solo after the canon-interlude. If you listen to the bassline only (center channel), you can't notice even the slightest sign of any tricky rhythm / odd meter being used, it sounds in straight 4/4 throughout.
On paper one could transcribe any (? - I may be wrong) rhythmically non-repetitive odd metered tune in 4/4. With a strong sense of rhythm you could count along straight 4/4 tunes with "fake" shifted (eg. by an eighth beat) beats.

Back to the first mentioned pattern: in the bassline it sounds the most naturally in
4/4 > 5/4 > 4/4 > 4/4 > 2/4 > 4/4 > 4/4 > 4/4 > 5/4
the difference is the last three measures.


A microscopic detail: the Solo3 slightly changes the Chorus progression: the bass arpeggios feature major thirds for the tonic (D (Dm)) chord. Very nice and majestic sounding change IMO.

to Sebastian:

> An idea I just thought is that perhaps if you find a
> couple hours to work on it, you can make an analysis
> for 'Sweet Lady' and then you have all the album finished!

Maybe next year (the 30th anniversary of ANATO).
On paper I surely could find a couple of hours. I have
"enough" time to check this forum multiple times a day,
but I still felt "guilty" for spending those hours writing
that analysis for a long while.
20.Sebastian 13 Mar 2004 00:37
One more:

Wrong statement: "On the other hand, Roger also helps the listener pick up the "lost" downbeats by adding cowbells (E and D#)."

Correction: "On the other hand, Roger also helps the listener pick up the "lost" downbeats by adding marimba (E and D#)."
21.Sebastian 17 Dec 2004 07:50
Drowse: Not that it`s any major mistake, but Careless Whisper is a song from George Michael, not Wham. He released it under his own name three weeks after Wake Me Up (which is indeed Wham).
22.PD 22 Dec 2004 14:36
Thanks. Recently I corrected many things that you posted here. I bet there remained many uncorrected.

Sebastian: could you please quote Brian's comment on the japanese influence on "Teo Torriate"?
23.Sebastian 22 Dec 2004 16:50
I did notice the Loser and the Drowse things this morning. There are some redaction odd parts here and there but they remain unnoticed unless you read those articles twenty times :)

Brian`s quote is no longer online, sadly, and I could only recover what he said about You Take My Breath Away:

"Going into the recording of "Races" we just had come back from a sensational tour in Japan, and fallen in love with all things Japanese, including of course some of their music. The opening piano figure on which Breath is based is very deliberately on the Japanese Pentatonic scale. Freddie was also clever enough to leave the sustain pedal down at exactly the right moment so all the five notes could be heard beating with each other as the chord dies away. The vocals are based on the background chords which is why they achieve a similar effect when a 'spin' is put on them"

Now, I distinctly remember Brian had put a note about Teo between brackets inside that YTMBA comment, but I deleted the note because I wanted to separate them (very bad idea). He said in the brackets "my Teo Torriate is also based on Pentatonic Scale. In essence, it`s a Western Minor Scale with "Fe" and "Ra" left out". Yes, I`m sure he wrote the wrong names of the notes because I remember pointing that out to a friend.
24.Sebastian 26 Dec 2004 20:14
Just to be very nitpicky, some mistakes either content-wise or gramathically. None of the following are big mistakes or so, but they`re the difference between great analyses and great+ analyses:

----

> `39: "Mrs. Robbinson"

It`s actually spelled with only one b (Robinson), at least the name of the film character is like that, so I guess the song title is Robinson as well. I don`t have the soundtrack here to check :(

> Bo Rhap: Album: A Night At The Opera (1975), 10th track

I think, if my memory isn`t tricking me, that it`s the 11th (as mentioned before, not a big deal anyway)

> Bo Rhap: Single: November, 1975

Similar microscopic mistake. The single was released on Halloween, which is one day before November begins :) Btw, in several parts of Bo Rhap you mis-spell timpani with a "y" at the beginning ("tympani"). In the Brighton Rock one you do have it correct

> World: Except the intro motif, we don't know what other ideas and tunes came from Brian and what from Freddie

Actually we do considering Fred`s interview at Munich, where he says "he came up with the chords".

> Love Of My Life: non-repetitive lead melody: note the lack of lead melody repetition within the sections.

I think that`s a little redundant. You can leave just one of the sentences since they`re both the same and what it`s worse, they`re consecutive, producing a little odd sensation when you read the article. Btw in the left menu you have the third word "life" instead of "Life", which would make more sense starting with upper case

> Play The Game: Synthesizers' public debut on a Queen song ("Save Me" was recorded earlier, though).

Yes, and released earlier, hence the actual public debut is Save Me`s single (same year but a little earlier)

> Princes: Single (US only): 17 March, 1986

Australia as well. Probably more territories outside Europe

> Seaside: Album: A Night At The Opera, 6th track

It`s actually 7th, and I`m sure because `39 is 5th and is followed by Sweet Lady

> Seaside: Single: 25 January 1980 (UK)

Copied from the Save Me article I suppose

> Sleeping: Single: 30th may, 1980

Similar case :). Btw Play The Game is almost entirely with bold font (at least in my navigator), dunno why

> Show: In the Queen songbook this is something unique: it comes close only to the use of alternate verses in early Taylor songs

I think I Want It All too has verse+chorus over the same progression so it`s not that unusual considering it`s the same composer and only one or two years of difference

> Continued from same part: (Non-Queen example is ABBA's "The Winner Takes It All").

I don`t think it`s the best example, I mean the verse and choruses do have a slight difference in the chords (as you can see in my transcription). They`re almost the same anyway, but you can choose dozens of other tracks that do fulfill the requisite completely: With Or Without You, What`s Up, Will You Be There...

> Prophet`s Song: In the second half of 1960s many bands (Deep Purple, Uriah Heep, Pink Floyd, Nice, Gentle Giant, Emerson Lake And Palmer, King Crimson)

To be very nitpicky, Emerson Lake & Palmer begun in 1970 (duh!).

--------

Besides that, in case I didn`t say it before: fantastic articles!!!
25.PD 03 Jan 2005 14:27
Thanks!

I have corrected most of your points. Nice observation regarding "I Want It All" - "Show".
26.Sebastian 10 Jan 2005 07:51
> Killer Queen: No wonder it won the Ivor Novello award in 1975

I don`t know how did that rumour begin, but as far as I know it didn`t win, and in the academy website they don`t list it at all. They do mention Bo Rhap, Driven By You, Too Much Love and Living On My Own, and the double A Bo Rhap / Days Of Our Lives. I guess Killer Queen was nominated or something then, or it`s just another one of those urban legends
27.PD 10 Jan 2005 15:02
< I don`t know how did that rumour begin
I dont know either, but it a widespread legend (1975). Sure its not true?
If yes, the Queen fandom ought to eliminate it.
28.Sebastian 10 Jan 2005 21:17
I`m sure. It might have been nominated though. You can look each year`s winner at:
www.britishacademy.com
29.PD 16 Feb 2005 09:49
Unfortunately all the recent correction updates on the articles fell victim to the 02.06 server crash. Gonna take long time to re-do them.
Fortunately the forum posts have all been saved.
30.Sebastian 16 Feb 2005 19:06
It`s really a shame. But just the fact to have updated them before in the first place demonstrates it wasn`t time wasted. There`ll always be next time. Things like that really teach you how to be patient ;)
31.PD 24 Feb 2005 14:40
I have just spent some painstaking hours on the articles. I could not reconstruct the pre-crash state of the articles perfectly because many changes and additions were not documented.
For the next months (?) I am expected to have not much time for song analysis.
Keep on collecting out the to-be corrected points. Thanks!
32.Sebastian 24 Feb 2005 14:48
I`m having a similar situation here, job things plus my personal life have kept me from finishing the website. Is this the end of the scientific approach in non-Beatles rock music?
33.PD 24 Feb 2005 15:43
Dont be so pessimistic! :) There is always a chance for someone to come, registrate and continue the project. Or write a book at least.
34.Sebastian 25 Feb 2005 14:27
Yeah, it`s merely a matter of order. I think that this forum only has got enough material for an encyclopedia.
35.PD 28 Feb 2005 16:32
Fortunately Libor got the update reports in his mailbox. He posted it to me and I
was able to reconstruct the updated versions with simple cut and paste operations.
It took me just an hour. I hope it went without big errors by me.

36.PD 08 May 2005 18:32
Lately I was revising both "Two Legs" and "White Queen" on paper. Hoperly soon (or later) I will have time to update it here.
37.Daniel 09 May 2005 05:16
> Most importantly, Freddie ended on the highest possible note with The Show Must
Go On

The note there is a D4 with head voice, Its very high but not the highest,  He reach it in lot of other songs like don't try so hard , princes .....   . He also reach a Eb in innuendo and Lets turn it on,  but the highest ever is an E4 in Hang on In There.  
Anyway its really not something really memorable taking into account the fact that many other singers do it and ever better and higher ,  Ex; Robert Plant sings a G4 in Since I've loving You with his head voice
38.PD 30 May 2005 09:18
Patience please, its a slow business.
No On But You and MMB are also being completed, then I may continue with Now I'm Here (and Radio Gaga).
39.Sebastian 30 May 2005 16:26
Don't worry, take your time. I might not be posting with the frequency I used to but I'm still interested :)
40.Sebastian 30 May 2005 16:31
Speaking of Ivors, here's the list of winners this year:

Best Song - Dry Your Eyes
Best Contemporary Song - Take Me Out
Best Film Score - Enduring Love
Most Performed Work - Toxic
International Hit Of The Year - Vertigo
Best Selling UK Single of The Year - Do They Know It's Xmas
Outstanding Song Collection - Brian May, Freddie Mercury, John Deacon & Roger Taylor
International Achievement - Robert Smith
Outstanding Contribution to British Music - Duran Duran
Special International Award - Lou Reed
Special Award For Songwriting - Mick & Keith
41.PD 19 Jul 2005 12:49
White Queen and Two Legs have been updated. Compared to the long waiting time the changes dont seem to big. The articles were not grammatically corrected.
NOBY, MMB, and CS articles are soon going to come.
42.PD 26 Aug 2005 17:56
No One But You and My Melancholy Blues has just been updated.
Now I'm Here is going to be started soon. It surely will take long time.
43.Sebastian 08 Nov 2005 18:30
I've got a different interpretation in the Keep Yourself Alive harmony:

During the second part of the verse it seems there's a modulation to Fm even if the tonic chord is not present, but the functions are just about logical for that key, as is the progression (V-VI-III-V), plus the I>i key change is a very Brianesque solution.

If so, then we'd have a nice i>bVII (triple-step) modulation for the chorus pivoting on V-bVII.
44.PD 09 Nov 2005 11:46
The i>bVII modulation falls in the "neighbour key" class.

Those two chords (bVI and bIII) I interpreted as borrowed chords from the bIII key, which can be interpreted as a momentary modulation to that key.
45.Sebastian 09 Nov 2005 12:28
As far as I know, the "neighbour" modulation would be i>VII (Fm to Eb), but in this case we'd be speaking about Fm to D, in which case there's only one note in common (Fm's got 4 flats, D's got 2 sharps).
46.PD 10 Nov 2005 19:49
> it seems there's a modulation to Fm even if the tonic chord is not present,
> but the functions are just about logical for that key, as is the progression (V-VI-III-V)
Now I have thought about this. Interesting theory. While on paper it does make sense, personally my ears refuse to interpret
it in Fm. Not because of the absence of the tonic. In "Leaving Home" I hear E Major tonality in spite of the absence of the tonic.
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