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Sebastian: Songwriters12 Dec 2002 01:15

Hey, PD, can you tell me who do you think wrote 'Is This The World', you know, looking at the progression, etc.

Btw, I also don't know about Stealin'

See you later.

PS: To add something to the info on synths, if you listen (or see) 'Teo Torriate' at Seibu Lions Stadium, the outro is played on the Roland Jupiter 8 "sounding" like a piano, and it's just awful, that's what I was talking about

1.PD 12 Dec 2002 11:46
Regarding "The World We Created":
The intro sequence is tipical Brian. I mean the pedal bass (D). Freddie have not been using pedal bass since "... Black Queen", but I may be wrong. One minor Freddiesque detail is the chromatic decent in the intro sequence. Brian wrote usually ascending ones, but this song easiliy can be the counter-example (along with Scandal).
Also the modulation between the parallel keys (D Major - d minor) is something much more characteristic of Brian (eg. Teo Torriate) than of Freddie.

---------------------------------------
13/01/03 PS: I was wrong here. The song modulates from D Major to b minor. More details soon (or later) in the ITTWWC analysis article.
---------------------------------------
I guess that the framework is at least 80% Brian's. Freddie could have contributed with the lead melody and the lyrics.
The song form is so simple that it's not characteristic of either of them.

Another song to debate about is "I Guess We're Falling Out". People reffered it as Brian's, but the chords were more Freddie-esque for my ears.


Stealin': it's not the tipical song that I could analyse by its chords. It's like a blues jam over simple three chord progressions. Brian must have created the solo/break (a really special one, quite atypical for him) and several licks he drops in toward the end of the long version. John must be the one who has created the bass-motive, and Freddie must have created the majority of the lead melody. I don't know whose lyrics it was originally, but I guess more of them added lines to it. We should ask them.
2.Sebastian 12 Dec 2002 20:59
According to 'David Richards' Don't Try So Hard is a collaboration between Brian and Freddie, and the lyrics are Freddie's. Can you tell me who do you think wrote the music according to the musical analysis, again?

By the way, we didn't have a bottomline in the whole "on which song on Queen I did Brian play piano", did we?

I guess 'I Guess' is from Fred, the piano matches him. Now that you say it 'Stealin' is a kind of jam session.

Now, if we see 'Innuendo', Fred is the one who came up with most of it. Roger made the percussion arrangements (like timpani and bells and stuff) and apparently part os the lyrics. Brian contributed to the arrangements of the heavy part, but I didn't think at first that he wrote the flamenco section because if he had he would played it.

According to David, it was Freddie who asked Mr. Howe to play on 'Innuendo', but according to Steve, it was Brian. Now, it's probably that Brian wrote that part and considered another guitarist could do it better, since he did later on during 'The Guv'nor'. Another contradiction David Richards had with Steve is about the brand of the guitar. On one interview David said it was a Gibson, then he said it was an Armstrong, and Steve again said it was a Gibson.

So, again we have two options:

1. Freddie invented the flamenco part and asked Brian to do it, but when Steve came to the studio Brian asked him to do it.
2. Brian invented the flamenco part and wanted Steve to do it.

I really really think it was Freddie. At one side, there's that descending bass you told me, also Freddie had just done Barcelona, which clearly impulsed him to make more orchestral arrangements (like the "you can be anything you want to be" part), but also could have inspired him to make a research in Spanish music, while Brian didn't have reasons to do it, unless he just had curiosity, but the Barcelona cause has more sense.

Just to you know, by the way, Brian played one of the Spanish rhythm guitars, and David Richards played one of the keyboards of the orchestral part.
3.PD 15 Dec 2002 20:59
Replying takes time for me nowaday...

Don't Try So Hard
> Can you tell me who do you think wrote the music according to the
> musical analysis, again?
I'm going to deal with this later (I mean soon).

>"on which song on Queen I did Brian play piano", did we?
Not yet.

> I guess 'I Guess' is from Fred, the piano matches him.
"I Guess" is still not worked out in terms of songform. If they would have finished it I expect that the song would have included brand new sections (not just Verse and Chorus), and I think they would have dropped the guitar break.

> Now that you say it 'Stealin' is a kind of jam session.
Stealin (both short and long version) shows sings of real songwriting: fixed lead melodies, multitrack harmonies, pre-planned song structure.

> Now, if we see 'Innuendo', Fred is the one who came up with most of it.
David Richard has told this? I suspect that the different sections of the song all have differently weighted credits on songwriting. The Bridge is the most Freddiesque, but I should analyse it more closely.

> but I didn't think at first that he wrote the flamenco section
> because if he had he would played it.
Someone posted this onto a web-board:
"brian may said in an interview that he and steve jammed a lot of ideas in the studio while recording the acoustic section of the song innuendo. they were just ad-libbing and putting alot of things on tape to experiment with."
I don't know which interview it is. I add that Steve playing in the progressive band Yes was more into in odd time signatures than any Queen members. That's why I'm curious of who came up with that 5/4 motive. I wish it was Brian, but I don't know.

> Now, it's probably that Brian wrote that part and
> considered another guitarist could do it better,
Howe definitely has more advanced fingepicking technique than Brian does. (I'm not sure howe didn't use a plectrum for his solos)

> On one interview David said it was a Gibson, then he said it was
> an Armstrong, and Steve again said it was a Gibson.
Then it was Gibson. I wish we had a photo or footage of these sessions.

> 1. Freddie invented the flamenco part and asked Brian to do it,
> but when Steve came to the studio Brian asked him to do it.
> 2. Brian invented the flamenco part and wanted Steve to do it.
Nothing is excluded, but I expect Brian and Steve composing that section entirely.

> I really really think it was Freddie.
I have big doubts about it, but I have no real arguments against it.

> At one side, there's that descending bass you told me,
That's a cliche bass line and chord progression:
i > VII > VI > V
Not chromatic but diatonic. In "Don't try So Hard" there is a chromatic line, but at the moment I can't decide whose creation it is.

> impulsed him to make more orchestral arrangements (like the "you can
> be anything you want to be" part),
I guess Freddie behind that section.

> but also could have inspired him to make a research
> in Spanish music,
Hmm... I have no idea where the idea of the flamenco section came from.

> while Brian didn't have reasons to do it,
Queen members had the habit to import musical elements from unexpected styles. They were famous for this.

> Brian played one of the Spanish rhythm guitars,
There are lots of them to choose from: the opening arpeggios, the strummed guitars during the solo, etc...

> David Richards played one of the keyboards of the orchestral part.
Did he played his own arrangement?
4.Sebastian 16 Dec 2002 14:59
Regarding 'Innuendo', that's one of my favourite Queen songs and one of the ones I have more information about.

So this are the exact words:

Brian: "The Spanish motif is suggested from the start; those little rifts at the beginning are sort of Bolero-esque. It seemed like the natural thing to explore those ideas on an acoustic guitar, and it just gradually evolved. Steve Howe helped out and did a fantastic job. We love all that stuff - it's like a little fantasyland adventure"

David Richards: "Freddie played keyboards on Innuendo, The Miracle and Was It All Worth It (Korg M1). He played a strong role in the writing of these songs"

Steve Howe: "they played me 'Innuendo' and I go, yeah, heavy metal flamingo! And then Brian says, 'Look, I'd like you play on this,' and I said you're joking, it sounds great, leave it like it is, and he said, 'No no no, I want you to play on it, I want to you to play really fast, I want you to run around the guitar a lot.' So within a couple of hours I tested some of his Gibsons, Chet Atkins classical solid body guitars, and found one that I helped balance the strings because he wasn't sure how to balance the volume between the different strings which is the important thing to do on those guitars. So I got up and running, we did a few takes, we edited it a little bit, we fixed up a few things, then we went and had dinner. So we went back to the studio and they said we really really like this and I said fine, let's go with it"

The whole thing started as an improvisation. Then Fred started to add lyrics to it. On those two albums I find it quite common that after one jam session, somebody arranges the song, adds lyrics, and at the end again all the members of the band contribute to the lyrics and each one's particular part (Fred's arranges the keyboards, Roger the percussion, Brian the guitar solo and John the bass)

On the band they did import other styles, and Brian did study some of classical guitar at the time (note 'Too Much Love' and 'Another World'), but there's no reason of crediting him without serious arguments.

The acoustic guitar Brian played was the strummed, and the arrangement he made was to repeat the solo afterwards on the Red Special. I think David Richards arranged the keyboard that echoes the melody "anything you want to be". He played it. On those times the band was not quite a band, they visited the studio, put their parts, sometimes they joined together and wrote or made something, but most of time it was David Richard who had to keep the songs alive.

Brian, for example, wasn't even at the studio when Fred wrote the riff of 'Hitman', then when Brian added lyrics and changed it, John came (which means he wasn't there either), and arranged it. All the backing vocals are Brian's (which means Fred or Rog weren't there on that moment).

Show Must Go On wasn't started by Brian either. John and Roger had the sequence, then Brian added the lyrics and worked it out with Fred. It was David who suggested the key change.

Was It All Worth It was Fred's, although the lyrics were worked between the four of them, like Roger writing the "we love you madly" line. I think 'Innuendo' was the same thing. I even have doubts about John, did he even say something about that song?

Bijou was just a one-hour session between Fred and Brian, Fred playing the string part and Brian adding the solo, that's all. I think none of the pieces was 100% from just one person (like 'Bo Rhap' 16 years before).

There were two ways of writing at that time: one, the previously mentioned jam session, and the other, a member of the band brought a song and then it was re-arranged and recorded.

David told that John made the demos on his house and showed them for Freddie to sing on them and add keyboards. That's probably what happened with 'Pain Is So Close' back on 1986 and 'Cool Cat' four years before that.

Brian had 'Headlong' and 'I Can't Live With You' for his solo career, Fred wrote 'All God's People' for Barcelona, and there's so few that has been commented about the ideas and inspiration from Roger behind 'Ride The Wild Wind' and 'Days Of Our Lives'.

Each song had it own history, that's so nice.

By the way, that's the list of David Richard's participation on Queen:

- 1981, piano on 'Under Pressure' (not the one that makes chords, but the one that makes the famous lick)
- 1986, computer drum-machine on 'Who Wants To Live Forever'. By the way, I don't think that Roger and John participated on that song, although Phillip said Rog made drums, he doesn't have proofs (neither do I), but the style of the percussion doesn't match Roger's, so I think it was by the percussionist of the orchestra.
- 1988, synth-bass on Scandal
- 1988, additional keyboard on 'My Life Has Been Saved'
- 1990, additional synth on 'Innuendo'
- 1990, synth-sequence on 'I Can't Live With You'
- 1990, conga percussion on 'Days Of Our Lives'

The most important arrangement ideas he gave to the band were the key change on 'Show' and the general structure on 'Heaven For Everyone'
5.PD 16 Dec 2002 21:38
> those little rifts at the beginning are sort of Bolero-esque.
This remark refers to the rhythm motif that can be found in the Intro.

> "Freddie played keyboards on Innuendo, The Miracle and Was It All Worth It
> (Korg M1). He played a strong role in the writing of these songs"
Miracle is very particularly Freddie-esque. Very clever song.

The cited interviews made me guess that the 5/4 lick (ie. the main motif of the flamanco part) is Brian's creation.

The Verse-Chorus theme is unusual for their own style. Especially in modal point of view.

Talking about modality: once someone treated the flamenco part as being in phrygian mode, but this approach would use E as the tonic instead of Am, what I prefer.

> On the band they did import other styles, and Brian did study
> some of classical guitar at the time (note 'Too Much Love'
> and 'Another World'),
This kind of spanish-guitar influenced soloing is an early feat of Brian's style. Think of Polar Bear and Life Is Real.

> when Fred wrote the riff of 'Hitman',
very nice and useful details.

> It was David who suggested the key change.
It's the Bridge. Especially the Bridge-Chorus transition. That's one of the most distinctive key change in the whole Queen songbook and also in the rock-history, IMO. I suppose Mike didn't write the Bridge section, only suggested how to get back to the original key of the Chorus.

> Bijou was just a one-hour session between Fred and Brian,
I think they (at least Brian) already had most of the music in their head by the time they entered the studio.

> I think none of the pieces was 100% from just one person
> (like 'Bo Rhap' 16 years before).
Yeah, this is an important trend in their songwriting habits in their late period.

> David told that John made the demos on his house and
> showed them for Freddie to sing on them and add keyboards.
Very interesting.

> Fred wrote 'All God's People' for Barcelona,
With Mike Moran. I wish I knew more about how they composed those songs for Barcelona. For example The Fallen Priest has a very nice contrapuntal harmonies and chord progressions and I'm dying to know who exactly can be credited for each of them. I wish Freddie would be behind the clever parts, but I suspect Mike was the one spending more time on piano during the composing sessions, thus he could affect the chord progressions more strongely.

> Each song had it own history, that's so nice.
The nicest analogy I ever wrote was in a letter I wrote for Philipp:
"Queen's music is like a galaxis. You can zoom to any part of it and you'll find glittering stars or even star systems. (and a couple of less glittering asteroids)." (tad modified)

> - 1981, piano on 'Under Pressure' (not the one that makes chords,
> but the one that makes the famous lick)
Not the most challanging piano parts, but it's a very important lick. David Bowie was also credited for piano on the demo version. Who actually has composed that lick?

> Rog made drums,
the tympany licks?

> the general structure on 'Heaven For Everyone'
?
6.Sebastian 17 Dec 2002 01:15
Brian said that the panish motif is suggested from the start, but not that it was suggested BY HIM. Anyway, I'm 80% at Brian's side for that part.

David didn't write any part of Show, I mean he suggested the key change for the "whatever happens" verse, to make it more rising effect instead of Brian's linear original idea. Note that Brian hardly transposed the key (I don't remember any band example, only a Beatles one, And I Love Her). What I meant on 'Heaven For Everyone' is that, again, David tranposed the lines and chords in the chorus, again for a rising up effect, while Roger's original song was more linear.

About 'Under Pressure', people said that Bowie played the piano on 'Feel Like' but there are no proofs, somebody could have made that up and told people. David Bowie's experts say that he didn't participate on 'Feel Like' at all. It's like people saying Brian composed 'My Life Has Been Saved', almost 90% of Queen fans think that, but that's not true. The lick was made when Bowie was alone in the studio with David making some overdubs.

David Richards came up with the piano lick, and Bowie played one of the synthesisers.

For the 'Barcelona' album, I think it was Freddie behind most of the songs, but Mike helped him on the arrangements, so much that Fred co-credited him for the composing, but if you look Fred already had Barcelona and Exercises In Free Love when he first met Montserrat. Mike's contribution was so big that Fred would feel so bad if he credited all the songs to him, and on those years the band was turning so generous (look how Fred gave to the band beautiful pieces like 'Miracle' or 'Slightly Mad' and let them be credited by all of them)

Although the video of 'Forever' shows Rog and John playing, that doesn't mean they did on the studio. Also the 'Magic' video shows John on a banjo and he didn't play banjo on the record.

See you
7.PD 17 Dec 2002 20:57
> David didn't write any part of Show, I mean he suggested the key change
> for the "whatever happens" verse
Yeah, OK. That key shift was a very good choice. Without it the song would sound tad monotone.

> Note that Brian hardly transposed the key.
Not very frequently. Keep Yourself Alive comes to my mind. I'm curious who suggested those other few key shifts in Queen songs: Breakthrou, Pain, Slightly Mad...

> About 'Under Pressure', people said that Bowie played the piano
> on 'Feel Like' but there are no proofs,
It's a pity

> The lick was made when Bowie was alone in the studio with David making
> some overdubs. David Richards came up with the piano lick,
I thought it must be Freddie, because it reminds me of the piano lick in "Get Down Make Love".
8.Sebastian 18 Dec 2002 19:34
If we look at the three songs you mentioned: 'Breakthrou', 'Slighlty Mad' and 'Pain', they all have strong participation by Freddie.

Regarding 'Bijou', I don't think Brian had it all prepared, it's a mental connection between him and Freddie and the solo isn't that complex, it used delay and stuff and probably it was just something that came from Brian's fingers when he was listening Freddie record the keyboard part.

I think you should add some 'Innuendo' album analysis, because you've made a great work on the early days, but for the synth era there's not so much.
9.PD 19 Dec 2002 16:04
> If we look at the three songs you mentioned: 'Breakthrou',
> 'Slighlty Mad' and 'Pain', they all have strong participation by Freddie.
Yes, but it's still not a very strong argument to expect each three the key changes credit to Freddie.


> I don't think Brian had it all prepared,
I mean just some basic licks. But it's just a guess, nothing more.


> I think you should add some 'Innuendo' album analysis, because you've made
> a great work on the early days, but for the synth era there's not so much.
The original plan covers the full Queen songbook. I don't know how fast can I make progress with the song analysis in the future, but currently I am stucked between song No31 (Teo) and No32 (MFKing).
Next songs:
33 The Loser In The End
34 In Only Seven Days
35 Is This The World We Created
36 The Show Must Go On
37 Staying Power
38 A Kind Of Magic
39 '39
40 The Kiss
41 Dreamers Ball
42 We Are The Champions
43 These Are The Days Of Our Lives
44 Tie Your Mother Down
45 Who Needs You
46 Princes Of The Universe
47 Good Company
48 The Miracle
49 Innuendo
...

The dominance of no-synth period among the first 30 articles was motivated by the "back to the roots" phylosophy.
10.Sebastian 19 Dec 2002 17:45
Ok, I'll add some things that I know/think about those songs. Hope they'll help a little bit.

33 The Loser In The End

Oh God!, I didn't remember to look for that organ I told you about. Later I'll talk about it.

34 In Only Seven Days

I think the acoustic guitar must be from John, just matches his style. Great lyrics, maybe my favourites from him.

36 The Show Must Go On

The very first idea of the song (the sequence), was started off by John & Roger. Then Brian arranged it and added lyrics and solos and stuff.

37 Staying Power

Nice guitar duet between Brian and John. On the 'Hot Space' album they'd be more of those. The bass is played on synths, as well as on Dancer, Body Language and Calling All Girls.

38 A Kind Of Magic

Spike Edney added some keyboards. The reson... fights between Fred and Rog. They argued a lot on those days, and Roger's two songs were done using Spike as keyboardist. After Highlander was released, they calmed down a little and Freddie took both songs of Roger and re-arranged them adding other keyboards. All the harmonies on 'Magic' are by Fred (the song, not the album)

40 The Kiss

I think there's an e-piano on that song, guiding the orchestra. On 1977 Fred said he hated e-pianos, but since they were into synths then, Fred could have changed his mind.

41 Dreamers Ball

Nice combination of classical and normal acoustic guitars. For 'Jazz' there were lots of different acoustic used. Also the bass... I think it's fretless.

42 We Are The Champions

Harmonies 100% Freddie.

43 These Are The Days Of Our Lives

Conga drums played by David Richards, Brian's first take guitar solo, harmonies totally Freddie's.

44 Tie Your Mother Down

The harmonies seem pretty unusual to me, I'm wondering who came up with them. On the first two choruses the backing vocals only join on the word "down" and for the last sentence "all your love tonight" or "ain't no friend of mine".

45 Who Needs You

I'm wondering who played the solos. There are no proofs and both John or Brian could do it. I mean, Brian played acoustic better than John, but also Freddie could play anything Brian did on the piano much better, but still Brian played piano here and there, so, that's not a valid argument. It's hard to believe for me that in a John's song, Brian would play maracas, electric guitar choruses and acoustic solos while John only made a double tracked acoustic rhythm track. For God's sakes, it's a song from John.

46 Princes Of The Universe

Not so many synths as you could believe at first (same as 'Break Free'). Never heard a similar solo from Brian, that's so great.

47 Good Company

Harmonies 100% Brian, he reaches the second lowest note I've heard from him. The lowest is a B on 'Leaving Home'

48 The Miracle

A clearly Freddie's piece, although John did help with some chords and melody. Nice string arrangements, clearly an influence of Barcelona.

49 Innuendo

We've talked about this one so much, haven't we? The effect of playing the solo on acoustic and then on electric is so nice, I have one pre-Innuendo example, 'Love Song', by Tesla, on the live version. By the way, Brian seems to be great friends with the Yes people, Rick Wakeman is thanked on 'Back To The Light'.
11.PD 20 Dec 2002 18:44
I too add some thoughts on these songs.

The Loser In The End
It's a simple song of four chords and simple songform. It's gonna be a quick job to analyse.

In Only Seven Days
> I think the acoustic guitar must be from John, just matches his style.
I too think it must be John on acoustic guitar, but not sure. One of my favourite songs to play on guitar.

The Show Must Go On
The chorus and the verse shares the same chord progression. It surprised me when I realised this.

Staying Power
IMO this song is a gem of its genre. Shows what happens when a funk song is written not routin-wise. Nice arrangement. The demo version shows that the harmony progression of the orchestrated parts were hardly affected by ??? (the man with those hot a spacey horns).

A Kind Of Magic
No many chords, but the chord progression is unusual in a Rogeresque way. The outro solo reminds me Bicycle Race, very nice and playful arrangement. In the USA they rejected the song because they considered it "Euro-pop". That was the most stupid way to express Queen songs have a distinct style and don't sound like most of mainstream music of those days in the US. Until 1964 Beatles too was "Euro-pop" for Americans...
This song is an evergreen over here, a huge pop classic. IMO major reason behind the flop of both this song an the album in the US was the weak promotion.

The Kiss
> I think there's an e-piano on that song, guiding the orchestra.
I don't know...
This composition is a gem. Something like Because in the Beatles' songbook, or Procession by Brian. I wish Freddie would write longer pieces in this style. I thought about the possible influences of "Kiss", especially those tritone leaps between chords. The stylistically closest music I found was composed by Richard Strauss. I'm trying to find the title of the piece. I'm extremly interested how much ??? (the arranger of the orchestration) contributed to the music itself. I wish it was all Freddie, because it's very nice music.

Dreamers Ball
> Also the bass... I think it's fretless.
I don't know.
The guitar and the vocal harmonies are fantastic. The solo itself is one of my favourites.
The basic chord progression is not very complicated, but it's added nice leading chords (diminished and augmented ones as well).

We Are The Champions
A very nice piece of music in 6/8. Nice key changes and chord progressions.

These Are The Days Of Our Lives
> Conga drums played by David Richards,
that's new to me.
> Brian's first take guitar solo,
A classic guitar solo.

Tie Your Mother Down
> The harmonies seem pretty unusual to me,
It's a straightaway song. Modal inlfection and the shuffle beat shows the bluesy roots.

Who Needs You
> I'm wondering who played the solos.
The tipical thing that interviewers always forget to ask.

> There are no proofs and both John or Brian could do it.
Yes. John too had strong fingerpicking technique. Remember he learned Classical Gas on guitar back in the sixties.

There was another debate: piano vs guitar harmonics.

> It's hard to believe for me that in a John's song,
It's really something very unpredictable to come from John's pen. You're My Best Friend was too one. These songs came seemingly from the air. There is a curious chord G#halfdim that appears also in Spread Your Wings.

Princes Of The Universe
For my money this is one of the "greatest" Queen song of the eighties. Incredible. The first hard rocking Freddie song since "Let Me Entertain You" (omitting some solo songs). It's extremly powerful, clever, and has very nice chord progressions!

> Never heard a similar solo from Brian, that's so great.
This is one of his trademarks: solos that don't remind one of any earlier solos of his.

Good Company
Shows how can you write an experimental song using the music of old styles. The arrangement is a "tour de force", even though the arrangers of the swing era could do similar. I cannot think of any rock guitarist of Brian's generations who would be able to do something like this. Even Brian would have failed if he didn't prepare himself. The vocal harmonies also show Brian's craftmanship.

The Miracle
> A clearly Freddie's piece,
Yep.
> John did help with some chords and melody.
Yes, the opening chord progression (as I know). That's a very clever chord progression. The songform is very unusual too. In context of pop/rock music it's an exceptionally clever piece of music.

Innuendo
Another unpredictable Queen song. Very strange, very mood-setting. Probably the most complex UK No1 song in the whole nineties, something like Bohrhap was in the seventies.
12.Sebastian 20 Dec 2002 19:43
In response and complement to you:

> It's a simples song of four chords and simple songform

I wonder what is the Queen song with less chords? so far, this is the shortest number I've seen.

> I too think it must be John on acoustic guitar, but not sure. One of my favourite songs to play on guitar.

Yeah, I like it a lot. On piano mostly, the piano lines are just so beautiful (seems an improved version of Spread Your Wings)

> The chorus and the verse shares the same chord progression.

Same thing happens on 'I Want It All', written by the same person.

> the man with those hot a spacey horns

Ariff Mardin

About 'Magic', it wasn't even released in USA, there they released 'Princes' instead.

> A classic guitar solo.

Yeah, my favourite from Brian actually

> Remember he learned Classical Gas on guitar back in the sixties.

Yes, but that's not a big deal. Classical Gas is one of my all-time favourite songs, and it's so perfect, but it's not that hard to do on a guitar. I think Freddie, Roger or even Ringo Starr could do it.

> There was another debate: piano vs guitar harmonics.

Yeah, it is. I supported the piano theory because on one trivia made by the fan club there was a question which said "which instrument plays Freddie on 'Who Needs You' besides piano?". Then I listened to the midi and there it's an e-piano. On an interview that same year Fred said he hated e-pianos because they were "tiny and horrible". Now, credits don't mention John on e-piano, they do mention Fred on piano without specifying if it's acoustic or electric. But now I know he didn't play it. So, it's an uncredited e-piano by John or it's a guitar, so simple. The fan club is not 100% trustable, even 10%, because they used to say John wrote 'Don't Try So Hard' and Brian wrote 'My Life Has Been Saved'; for me, credits aren't 100% trustable either, but at least they're much more. So now I really think they're natural harmonics, because they echoe just that way.

About Innuendo, Brian said it so well, "Innuendo is one of those things that can be big or nothing", or something like that (I just wroter it by memory, don't have the interview here)

And finally, to add something about 'Princes', my theory is the following: behind a magical guitar solo, there is always a wonderful drum track. And it's true, just listen to Van Halen or Led Zeppelin, if I listen to a great guitar solo, in my case, it's 30% a work of the guitarist who actually plays the solo, and about 60% a work of the drums. So, in this case, thumbs up to Roger!
13.PD 21 Dec 2002 08:01
> I wonder what is the Queen song with less chords?
The bluesy ones: Sleeping On The Sidewalk, See What A Fool I've Been, Lost Opportunity. There are songs that have sections with three chords: Hammer To Fall, I Want To Break Free, ...
Roger too wrote some four-chord songs.

> so far, this is the shortest number I've seen.
?

>> The chorus and the verse shares the same chord progression.
> Same thing happens on 'I Want It All', written by the same person.
It was Roger's trademark in the seventies to write rather different tunes to the same chord progression. In my analysis articles I treat them as alternate Verses: Drowse, Tenement Funster,...

> About 'Magic', it wasn't even released in USA, there they released 'Princes' instead.
Oops. Then take Radio Gaga as another "Euro-pop" song.

>> Remember he learned Classical Gas on guitar back in the sixties.
> Yes, but that's not a big deal.
In fact I have not tried it yet. I've listened recently four versions of it (original, Clapton, Steve Howe, California Guitar Trio) and it sounded tad more challenging than Who Needs You.

> I think Freddie, Roger or even Ringo Starr could do it.
I have doubts about it :)

> About Innuendo, Brian said it so well, "Innuendo is one of those things
> that can be big or nothing", or something like that
That's very true.

Now I have to take a break from this board and song analyis for 1-2 weeks. I'll be back.
14.Jason 07 Jan 2003 17:01
> Also the 'Magic' video shows John on a banjo and he didn't play banjo on the record.

the same video also features Brian playing an acoustic - there is no acoustic guitar on the record either
recall the THEME of the video...where freddie comes along and uses 'a kind of magic' to turn the homeless bums living in an old theatre into Queen...so the banjo turns to a bass and the acoustic becomes the red special...
15.BrianMay 15 Mar 2003 20:41
" I guess 'I Guess' is from Fred, the piano matches him.
"I Guess" is still not worked out in terms of songform. If they would have finished
it I expect that the song would have included brand new sections (not just Verse and
Chorus), and I think they would have dropped the guitar break."

There are more versions of this song.
The guitar break was only recorded for the medley.
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