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PD: The double plagal cadence27 Oct 2002 20:26

The double plagal cadence is a frequently used chord progression in pop/rock music.
The plagal cadence is IV > I, the double plagal cadence goes like bVII > IV > I. For example
C > G > D in the key of D major.
Queen songs featuring double plagal cadence:
Crazy Little Thing, Save Me, Friends Will Be Friends, Procession, Breakthrou, Put Out The Fire, Headlong, Don't Try So Hard, You Don't Fool Me and some more.
Old Friends (Roger Taylor)

This chord progresion is thought to have became widely used in the sixties. If you try to find earlier examples, you'll probably fail. This progression was a Beatles-favourite, no wonder Beatles-scholar Ian Hammond has done a nice research on it:

*groups.google.com
another discussion:
*groups.google.com

I managed to find an example before 1964:
The Shadows: Round And Round (1963)
it starts with A > G > D > A
The same progression appears in another Shadows track: The Lost City (1965).

Paul Anka - Lonely Boy (1959). It's played quickly like a riff.

If you find an even earlier example of it, don't hesitate to drop here a line.



In the discussions it is mentioned the double plagal cadence can be originated from the
I - IV vamping repeated a fourth step higher. An example I've found:
The 'Chirping Crickets' & Budd : Not Fade Away (1957)

Another link:
  mto.societymusictheory.org

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